Low Dose Allergen (LDA) Therapy
Conditions

LDA (short for “low dose allergens”) is an ultra low dose, enzyme-activated immunotherapy. It is a method of immunotherapy enhanced by a minute dose of the enzyme beta glucuronidase (dose is 10-13). The beta glucuronidase activates extremely miniscule doses of various allergens (10-6 to 10-17) and stimulates the production of T-suppressor cells, now called T Regulator (T Reg) cells.  These cells actively “switch off” helper cells that are erroneously causing patients to be ill by misidentifying normal substances in the body to be allergens.

T-cells may live for long periods of time in the bloodstream, so LDA needs to be administered only every 2 months at first, and then less often as time passes, generally with one to three tiny (1/20 c.c.) intradermal (in the first layer of skin) injections on the inner aspect of the forearm.

LDA is used to treat all types of allergy, sensitivity and intolerance to inhalants (pollens, dust, mites, danders, etc.), foods and chemicals.  It is used to treat such conditions as seasonal and perennial hay fever, asthma, all types of food allergy and many other problems.

Asthma
Allergic Rhinitis
Hay Fever
Food Allergies
Chronic Sinusitis
Eczema
Psoriasis
LDA (short for “low dose allergens”) is an ultra low dose, enzyme-activated immunotherapy. It is a method of immunotherapy enhanced by a minute dose of the enzyme beta glucuronidase (dose is 10-13). The beta glucuronidase activates extremely miniscule doses of various allergens (10-6 to 10-17) and stimulates the production of T-suppressor cells, now called T Regulator (T Reg) cells. These cells actively “switch off” helper cells that are erroneously causing patients to be ill by misidentifying normal substances in the body to be allergens.
T-cells may live for long periods of time in the bloodstream, so LDA needs to be administered only every 2 months at first, and then less often as time passes, generally with one to three tiny (1/20 c.c.) intradermal (in the first layer of skin) injections on the inner aspect of the forearm.
LDA is used to treat all types of allergy, sensitivity and intolerance to inhalants (pollens, dust, mites, danders, etc.), foods and chemicals. It is used to treat such conditions as seasonal and perennial hay fever, asthma, all types of food allergy and many other problems.
Conventional “escalating dose” immunotherapy (where the dose is started “low” – generally 1 to 10,000, and increased over time to as high as 1 to 10, 1 to 20 or 1 to 100) is employed in this country by many allergists, primarily to treat hay fever and cat and dust mite allergy, which are primarily IgE mediated. This type of immunotherapy works by causing the patient to produce “blocking antibody” (specific IgG antibody), which inhibits the histamine-releasing ability (which produces the allergy symptoms) of the mast cell.
The higher the level of blocking antibody that can be produced, the more successful is the treatment. In order to produce adequate levels of blocking antibody, studies have shown that it requires administration of very high doses of allergen. Therefore, treatment using this method often causes intolerable swelling and other side effects before clinical efficacy can be attained, and can be dangerous due to the risk of severe reactions such as massive swelling, anaphylaxis, collapse and even death. Furthermore, only inhalants – not foods or chemicals – are used.
Deaths from conventional escalating dose immunotherapy are generally a result of anaphylaxis. This is due to the extremely high dose of antigen required to produce a significant clinical effect and high level of antibody. LDA immunotherapy, however, is cell-mediated (probably TReg) and extremely low dose. The very highest possible dose of LDA (some LDA antigens are lower) is at least a million times less than the standard dose for conventional immunotherapy.
The danger of fatal or life-threatening systemic reactions to LDA treatment is negligible. Well over 400,000 doses of EPD and an estimated 300,000 of LDA have been given worldwide, and – unlike many other types of immunotherapy – life-threatening reactions to EPD or LDA have never been reported.
Conventional escalating dose immunotherapy is generally administered twice weekly for the first four to six months of treatment. Once the very high maintenance dose is reached, the treatment interval may be extended to once every two weeks or even monthly, but rarely less often without return of symptoms. Conventional escalating dose immunotherapy cannot usually be stopped without the return of some or significant symptoms within 3 to 12 months of cessation.
As stated previously, LDA immunotherapy is extremely low dose and administered infrequently, only every two months at first, and later less often. Treatment is required only every two months initially for a period of approximately 12 months. After that time, the treatment interval may generally be extended to three months or longer. Most adults with significant problems require 16 of 18 treatments at these intervals of two months or less often, at which time treatment often may be discontinued. Of the approximately 50% of patients who are unable to discontinue LDA after 16-18 treatments without return of some symptoms, the majority will continue treatment longer at intervals of 6 months to a year. Children (under 12) may often stretch their treatments out earlier, and stop sooner without return of symptoms. Children as young as one month of age have been treated safely.

(source: Dr. W.A. Shrader)
The results of a North American Study on LDA , also known as Enzyme Potentiated Desensitization (EPD), are summarized here (improvement in frequency of symptoms):

Table I.  American EPD Trial Outcome Results

Improvement in Frequency of Symptoms (Nov., 1993 – Nov., 2000)

Description Patients No response Patients

evaluated

Excellent, Very Good, Good % Fair % No change %
to question   or worse
Repeated Ear Infections 281 15 266 236 89% 16 6% 14 5%
Secretory Otitis Media 39 9 30 26 87% 2 7% 2 7%
Repeated Chest Infections 251 13 238 192 81% 24 10% 22 9%
Asthma, seasonal only 210 3 207 163 79% 19 9% 25 12%
Angioedema 180 18 162 127 78% 12 7% 23 14%
Rhinitis, Seasonal 1361 67 1294 1011 78% 152 12% 131 10%
Allergic Conjunctivitis 1017 48 969 746 77% 125 13% 98 10%
Chronic Cough, not asthma 303 8 295 228 77% 37 13% 30 10%
Chronic Face ache 484 39 445 336 76% 61 14% 48 11%
Asthma 732 46 686 512 75% 91 13% 83 12%
Contact Dermatitis 176 11 165 124 75% 23 14% 18 11%
Headaches, Other 1186 89 1097 818 75% 149 14% 130 12%
Nasal Polyps 112 10 102 75 74% 13 13% 14 14%
Rhinitis, Perennial 2258 128 2130 1570 74% 297 14% 263 12%
Food Allergy, Other 2857 140 2717 1958 72% 399 15% 360 13%
Immediate Food Allergy 519 38 481 348 72% 59 12% 74 15%
Plugged Ears, moderately severe 402 14 388 276 71% 53 14% 59 15%
Chronic Anal Irritation 132 4 128 89 70% 20 16% 19 15%
Chronic Sinusitis 352 21 331 233 70% 49 15% 49 15%
Eczema 669 29 640 444 69% 91 14% 105 16%
Emotional/behavioral problems 488 15 473 327 69% 65 14% 81 17%
Irritable Bowel 613 38 575 397 69% 88 15% 90 16%
Candida-Related Complex 940 59 881 598 68% 156 18% 127 14%
Hyperactivity 578 34 544 372 68% 81 15% 91 17%
Mental confusion (brain “fog”) 1650 77 1573 1065 68% 263 17% 245 16%
Migraine/Severe Headache 691 36 655 448 68% 85 13% 122 19%
Chronic severe post-nasal drip 561 5 556 374 67% 102 18% 80 14%
Pruritis 177 4 173 116 67% 25 14% 32 18%
Chemical Sensitivity 1413 83 1330 858 65% 252 19% 220 17%
Gut Fermentation 699 35 664 431 65% 124 19% 109 16%
Ankylosing spondylitis 14 11 9 64% 2 14% 3 21%
CFIDS 152 9 143 91 64% 24 17% 28 20%
Chronic Fatigue, Other 887 55 832 535 64% 163 20% 134 16%
Constipation 399 22 377 237 63% 68 18% 72 19%
Hypertension 109 6 103 65 63% 17 17% 21 20%
Depression, significant 452 8 444 276 62% 80 18% 88 20%
Epilepsy 45 3 40 26 62% 3 7% 13 31%
Psoriasis 65 4 61 38 62% 11 18% 12 20%
Arthritis, Non-Specific 689 43 646 393 61% 124 19% 129 20%
Chronic Vaginal Symptoms 179 8 171 103 60% 32 19% 36 21%
Muscle Pains 561 35 526 318 60% 117 22% 91 17%
Rheumatoid Arthritis 76 3 73 43 59% 13 18% 17 23%
Crohn’s Disease 29 1 28 16 57% 6 21% 6 21%
Insomnia, moderately severe 423 9 414 225 54% 90 22% 99 24%
Autism 134 6 128 68 53% 31 24% 29 23%
Meniere’s Disease 47 41 25 53% 11 23% 11 23%
Dermatographia, dermagraphia 17 12 8 47% 3 18% 6 35%
Sjogren’s Syndrome 16 18 7 44% 4 25% 5 31%
Anosmia 116 5 111 48 43% 25 23% 38 34%
Multiple Sclerosis 5 4 1 25% 3 50% 1 25%

(Source: Dr. W.A. Shrader)

Low Dose Immunotherapy (LDI)

Conditions Treated with LDI:

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Lyme’s Disease

Chronic Fatigue

Post-Chlamydia Urethritis

Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

Chronic Yeast Infections

Asthma

Chemical Sensitivity

Post Shingles Neuralgia

IBS

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Lupus

LDI (short for Low Dose Immunotherapy) works by the same mechanism as LDA (described above) for treatment of many autoimmune conditions. The idea is that our chronic symptoms – especially after years of low grade infections and toxins – are caused by our immune systems continuing to react to the infection even after the bacteria may have been killed. Our bodies essentially keep attacking ourselves so we continue to feel sick.

 

LDI combines beta glucuronidase (an enzyme) with Lyme and/or other co-infection antigens ( Dr. Camp makes a unique formula for each patient) to help our immune systems build up tolerance. LDI is based on the idea that chronic Lyme and many other illnesses are an autoimmune condition.  There is much historical precedent in this arena from the bacteria Yersinia stimulating Hashimoto’s thyroid disease, to the bacteria Strep causing Rheumatic Fever and many others.  The Role of Infections in Autoimmune Disease:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2665673/

 

LDI can be thought of as an allergy shot for Autoimmunity: the treatment boosts and calms your immune system at the same time, meaning that your ability to kill the provoking bacteria or virus increases while the over-stimulated aspect of your immune system is calmed down, thus balancing your immune system and improving your quality of life dramatically.

The doses of the bacterial or viral antigen given are VERY TINY so, like a vaccine, your body learns to manage Lyme in miniscule doses so it can build up tolerance. LDI is administered either under the tongue or by a tiny shot under you skin.

Dr. Camp has recently had great success with Low Dose Immunotherapy for Lyme Disease , Chronic Fatigue, and many other types of ailments ( see below for a complete list). The theory behind LDI is that when Lyme enters the chronic stage it can becomes an autoimmune disease by stimulating auto-reactivity. This is why many patients still have symptoms despite prolonged antibiotic therapy.  The original infection may in fact be killed, but the immune system is still triggered and it essentially begins attacking itself.  It begins to stimulate the immune system as if allergic to itself, thus causing many of the symptoms of chronic Lyme.

 

The Art of LDI:  Dr. Camp has to create a unique treatment for each patient and what works perfectly for one patient will be the wrong treatment for another patient.

The correct dosage for each patient is unique:

  • With too low of a dose, you may not feel anything from the treatment.

 

  • With too high of a dose, your symptoms may flare up for 3 weeks and make you to feel worse. Of course, we don’t want this for you, so Dr. Camp starts patients on very low doses then gradually works upwards, depending on how your body tolerates the treatment.

 

  • When you get the right dosage for your body, you will experience a brief flare of your symptoms followed by a  relief in symptoms. Patients commonly report feeling “surges” of energy along with general feelings of well being. This relief generally does not last long with the first dose, but with each subsequent dose, your relief should gradually begin to last longer and longer.